asylum-art:

Necla Rüzgar: Human Skin Sculptures

"Fauna"

Ankara Gallery Nev starts the new year with the exhibition called “Fauna” by Necla Rüzgar. Having worked on painting, photography and video, this time the artist prefers a new medium while problematizing the effects of the social situations on individuals through conflicts/contradictions. “Fauna” consists of recent sculptures and installations which are to be exhibited for the first time.
Along with polyester castings, realist sculptures made of found objects such as a shoe or a stone cracks open the door of a familiar yet at the same time a strange world. This exceptionally fabulous world into which we step by being attracted to the life-size animal and woman figures changes its meaning as these figures are eminently hand in and glove with breathing. Encountering works in which the flesh becomes jewellery, the stone becomes flesh and the flesh becomes stone evokes admiration, astonishment, unease, shame, startle, and desire together.
Gallery Nev is working on a catalog which will be composed of photos taken once the exhibition is set up. These photos, then, will be accompanied by the texts by Susann Wintsch, curator and lecturer on Contemporary Arts at Zurich University of the Arts, and Nazile Kalaycı, associate professor of philosophy at Hacettepe University. Kalaycı describes “Fauna” as a highly significant and powerful exhibition which connects to the evil which is untraceable on the conscious, the traumatic events on the subconscious and the burden of the irreversible past.
Necla Rüzgar received her proficiency in art degree in 2004 at Hacettepe University Fine Arts Faculty, Department of Painting. As well as working as an associate professor at the same department, Rüzgar has exhibited her works in painting, photography and video at various cities, including İstanbul, İzmir, Diyarbakır, Berlin, Zürich and Seoul. Her works were exhibited recently at Akademi der Künste in Berlin and National Museum of Contemporary Art in Bucharest.
Ankara Gallery Nev will be hosting “Fauna” by Necla Rüzgar until 15th March 2014.
Via: aima007

asylum-art:

Necla Rüzgar: Human Skin Sculptures

"Fauna"

Ankara Gallery Nev starts the new year with the exhibition called “Fauna” by Necla Rüzgar. Having worked on painting, photography and video, this time the artist prefers a new medium while problematizing the effects of the social situations on individuals through conflicts/contradictions. “Fauna” consists of recent sculptures and installations which are to be exhibited for the first time.
Along with polyester castings, realist sculptures made of found objects such as a shoe or a stone cracks open the door of a familiar yet at the same time a strange world. This exceptionally fabulous world into which we step by being attracted to the life-size animal and woman figures changes its meaning as these figures are eminently hand in and glove with breathing. Encountering works in which the flesh becomes jewellery, the stone becomes flesh and the flesh becomes stone evokes admiration, astonishment, unease, shame, startle, and desire together.
Gallery Nev is working on a catalog which will be composed of photos taken once the exhibition is set up. These photos, then, will be accompanied by the texts by Susann Wintsch, curator and lecturer on Contemporary Arts at Zurich University of the Arts, and Nazile Kalaycı, associate professor of philosophy at Hacettepe University. Kalaycı describes “Fauna” as a highly significant and powerful exhibition which connects to the evil which is untraceable on the conscious, the traumatic events on the subconscious and the burden of the irreversible past.
Necla Rüzgar received her proficiency in art degree in 2004 at Hacettepe University Fine Arts Faculty, Department of Painting. As well as working as an associate professor at the same department, Rüzgar has exhibited her works in painting, photography and video at various cities, including İstanbul, İzmir, Diyarbakır, Berlin, Zürich and Seoul. Her works were exhibited recently at Akademi der Künste in Berlin and National Museum of Contemporary Art in Bucharest.
Ankara Gallery Nev will be hosting “Fauna” by Necla Rüzgar until 15th March 2014.
Via: aima007

asylum-art:

Dreamy photos with a story by Robby Cavanaugh

Artist onTumblr |Facebook |500px |on deviantART |Instagram |Flickr

The artist I want to introduce you to today, Robby Cavanaugh, isn’t only good with a camera, he also has a way with words. A snippet from a statement considering his work on his website:

“I edit my photographs to closely match the images in my mind, creating specific tones that match the feelings I wish to imbue in the viewer. My work requires intense planning and problem solving, but no matter how impossible a concept may seem, I never let it limit my ability to express the story I need to tell.”

asylum-art:

Levi van Veluw

on Behance |  Facebook

In  the Veneer series, Van Veluw introduces wood as a material in his work. Using different types of wood for different works, Van Veluw bends this relatively rigid material to his will by applying it to a replica of his face. This results in a myriad of cracks and grooves that testify to a notable tension of material and form. Included in this series are two sculptures that play with the viewer’s sense of scale. Veneer III has a height of 150 cm, whereas Veneer IV is merely 12 cm tall.

In the photographic versions of these sculptures, Van Veluw utilises photography’s ability to frame its subject matter and manipulate the viewer into thinking both objects are the same size. Veneer IV has a seemingly rough mosaic texture, yet in reality its surface is very smooth. The viewer, however, unaware of the modest size of the work, is unable to make this distinction.

Natural transfers: This series of work originates from the idea of transforming the face through the use of a material that is already present, rather than using an external element. Simply applying hair to the contours of the head transforms the portrait and the associations conjured up by the materials themselves. Hair becomes a strange and macabre material with a claustrophobic effect, rather than an aspect of human beauty.

For the Light series, Van Veluw covered his head with strips of light-generating foil. Photographed in total darkness, the highly radiant bright blue light produced by this material, allows it to stand out like an autonomous object. The features of Van Veluw’s face have disappeared, only its shape remains discernible through the mass of light strips. Light becomes form and exists independently from its base, the original subject. This ‘invisibility’ of the human subject informs the formal qualities of these images.

Via: artnau

asylum-art:

Illustrator Doodles Creative And Humorous Classical Painting 

(via asylum-art)

asylum-art:

Humo by Studio NOCC

Making the mundane poetic, Studio NOCC has introduced the Humo ashtray, which contains smoke in addition to ash that it is originally mean for.  It resembles a glass bulb or a clear, featureless skull.

An opening on one side allows the user to actually rest his cigar or cigarette on the wall of the ashtray itself. The smoke issued is instantly captured, turning any pollutive by-product into an image at least as poetic as the issuing cigarette.

The dynamism of the smoke within complements the gentle curvature of the ashtray. The French Studio NOCC is the brainchild of Juan Pablo Naranjo and Jean-Christophe Orthlieb , who are intent on not taking any object or prosaic tool for granted.

asylum-art:

Louis Edwin Fry, beyond the photographic patina

Artist on Tumblr | Flickr

London-based filmmaker and photographer Louis Edwin Fry likes serious artistic projects and conceptual images, able to stir emotions, but also requiring a certain amount of attention and discerning abilities.

After studying photography at Camberwell College of Arts he spent a year at the Academy of Visual Arts (HGB) in Leipzig. His portfolio boasts various photographic series, such as “Facemask”, a collection of portraits in which he “tried to capture and record both the physical state in front of the camera and the emotional state during the photographs’ creation”. Louis Edwin Fry has an eye that’s not only put to use in static images, filming is another passion of his.

His latest documentary project is called “Temnyy Girls”. Currently in post-production, it was shot in the area of Moscow and includes face to face interviews with lesbian girls forced to coexist with the harsh anti-gay laws promoted by Putin and the resulting amount of discrimination and exclusion. “Presently we are looking for final funding to complete the last interview translations”, explains Louis.

Photos via louisedwinfry.co.uk

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